Colin Robertson

Photo of Colin Robertson

Associate Professor Director, Cold Regions Research Centre Faculty of Science Geography and Environmental Studies Waterloo, Ontario crobertson@wlu.ca

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

Dr. Colin Robertson is a geographer broadly trained in Geographic Information Science and Spatial Analysis.

Colin is an associate with the national office of Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative where he works to develop new tools and models of wildlife health. As well, Colin is director...


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Bio/Research

Dr. Colin Robertson is a geographer broadly trained in Geographic Information Science and Spatial Analysis.

Colin is an associate with the national office of Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative where he works to develop new tools and models of wildlife health. As well, Colin is director of the Cold Regions Research Centre at Laurier.

Colin’s research interests centre on four inter-related areas:

-developing methods and tools for spatial-temporal analysis,
-spatial modelling at the animal/human health interface,
-citizen science and user-generated spatial data for enhancing community engagement in environmental research, and
-landscape scale spatial pattern analysis.

Colin's approach to research is frequently collaborative and interdisciplinary; working with both natural and social scientists to develop and apply new tools and datasets to answer complex spatial questions related to environmental change and wildlife health.


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