Jeff Heydon

Photo of Jeff Heydon

Instructor Faculty of Arts Communication Studies Waterloo, Ontario jheydon@wlu.ca

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Click to Expand >>

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

Click to Shrink <<

Bio/Research

Jeff Heydon completed his Bachelor of Arts at the University of Western Ontario in Media, Information and Technoculture. He received a Master of Arts from York University as a member of the joint Communication and Culture program at York University and Ryerson University.

His PhD study t...


Click to Expand >>

Bio/Research

Jeff Heydon completed his Bachelor of Arts at the University of Western Ontario in Media, Information and Technoculture. He received a Master of Arts from York University as a member of the joint Communication and Culture program at York University and Ryerson University.

His PhD study took place at the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths College, University of London. His thesis analyzed the use of CCTV footage as an indexical demonstration of proof in the United Kingdom and Canada (both in the court systems and in popular culture).

Jeff’s research and teaching interests range from media history, communication theory and specific text evaluation (including feature film, television and video games) to sociopolitical issues such as power, discourse, media and communications policy and political theory. His research focus is primarily surveillance studies, with an emphasis on image-focused surveillance technologies.

Currently, he is researching the use of social media systems and smartphones as a means of challenging dominant narratives in contemporary North American culture. Recordings of abuses of power by police are a focus as well as the recording of significant events by bystanders and the distribution of these videos via social media platforms rather than traditional broadcast media.


Click to Shrink <<

Links