Joseph Culp

Photo of Joseph Culp

Environment and Climate Change Canada Research Scientist in Residence Faculty of Arts Geography and Environmental Studies Waterloo, Ontario jculp@wlu.ca Office: (519) 884-0710 ext. 3631

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

I received my PhD from the University of Calgary in 1982 and was an Associate Professor at the University of Calgary from 1984 to 1990. I also hold positions as a research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada (1990 to present), a research professor at the University of New Brunswi...

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Bio/Research

I received my PhD from the University of Calgary in 1982 and was an Associate Professor at the University of Calgary from 1984 to 1990. I also hold positions as a research scientist with Environment and Climate Change Canada (1990 to present), a research professor at the University of New Brunswick (2002 to present) and currently a visiting research professor at Laurier.

During this time, my research has focused on the impacts of multiple stressors on aquatic systems, including the combined effects of nutrients, sediments and chemical stressors on the taxonomic and trait composition of stream benthos. At Laurier, my research investigates benthic biodiversity and ecological function of Arctic rivers, primarily in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

My research focuses on the understanding of, and ability to detect and predict the impact of climate change on freshwater biodiversity and the ecological structure and function of Arctic rivers. My current projects in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut evaluate the role of permafrost slumping on aquatic biodiversity of rivers, how freshwater food web structure and function changes with latitude, as well as the development of novel biomonitoring approaches for Arctic freshwater ecosystems. This research is integrated with collaborators across the circumpolar Arctic through my co-lead activities for the Arctic Council’s, Circumpolar Freshwater Biodiversity Monitoring Group.


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