Pam Bryden

Photo of Pam Bryden

Chair, Kinesiology and Physical Education Faculty of Science Kinesiology and Physical Education Waterloo, Ontario pbryden@wlu.ca

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

I received my BA in Psychology from the University of Western Ontario in 1992, my MSc in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo in 1995, and my PhD in Kinesiology and Psychology from the University of Waterloo in 1998.

Prior to joining Laurier, I was a postdoctoral fellow in the Dep...


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Bio/Research

I received my BA in Psychology from the University of Western Ontario in 1992, my MSc in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo in 1995, and my PhD in Kinesiology and Psychology from the University of Waterloo in 1998.

Prior to joining Laurier, I was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Psychology at the University of Guelph (1998-1999).

My program of research is an attempt to understand lateral preference and performance first from a bottom-up perspective to determine the motor requirements for particular tasks, and secondly, from a top-down perspective of how the brain is lateralized for skilled movement. My research to date has attempted to answer why there is a preferred-hand advantage in motor tasks and how this advantage is related to hand preference, in order to understand handedness and manual asymmetries, as well as how the hemispheres are organized for motor control in complex, goal-directed movement. In the last several years, I have focused my research on the development of handedness across the lifespan, in typically-developing individuals and those with developmental disabilities.


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