Philip Marsh

Photo of Philip Marsh

Canada Research Chair in Cold Regions Water Science Professor Faculty of Arts Geography and Environmental Studies Waterloo, Ontario pmarsh@wlu.ca Office: (519) 884-0710 ext. 2856

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

I received my PhD from McMaster University in 1983, and was a Research Scientist at the ECCC National Hydrology Research Centre in Saskatoon from 1984 until 2013. During this time, my research focused on the hydrology of the Canadian High Arctic and the Mackenzie River Basin, with much of my rese...

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Bio/Research

I received my PhD from McMaster University in 1983, and was a Research Scientist at the ECCC National Hydrology Research Centre in Saskatoon from 1984 until 2013. During this time, my research focused on the hydrology of the Canadian High Arctic and the Mackenzie River Basin, with much of my research over this period of time carried out in the Mackenzie Delta region of the NWT, with hydrologic studies of the Mackenzie Delta and the uplands to the east of the Delta. Since joining Laurier as a Canada Research Chair, my research has continued to focus on climate change issues in the NWT, and specifically at two long term research watersheds near Inuvik, NWT. These include Havikpak Creek and Trail Valley Creek.

This research is integrated into the Laurier – Government of the NWT Partnership program.

The primary focus of my research is the understanding of, and ability to predict the impact of climate change on the hydrology of arctic Canada. Specifically I am interested in understanding the integrated impact of changes in: climate, vegetation, permafrost, and snow, on lake levels and streamflow. My research integrates field observations of changes in hydrology in the western Canadian Arctic with both remote sensing and high resolution, numerical modelling, in order to better understand past and future changes in hydrology.


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