Scott M Ramsay

Photo of Scott M Ramsay

Associate Professor Faculty of Science Biology Waterloo, Ontario sramsay@wlu.ca Office: (519) 884-0710 ext. 2406

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

I received my PhD in Biology from Queen's University in 2000 and my BSc in Zoology from the University of Toronto in 1993. My graduate research focused on the mating competition and its consequences in female black-capped chickadees.

Prior to joining Laurier, I was a postdoctoral fellow ...


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Bio/Research

I received my PhD in Biology from Queen's University in 2000 and my BSc in Zoology from the University of Toronto in 1993. My graduate research focused on the mating competition and its consequences in female black-capped chickadees.

Prior to joining Laurier, I was a postdoctoral fellow in biology at St Mary's College of Maryland and Indiana State University (2000-2001). My postdoctoral research was on the genetics and ecology of mating strategies in white-throated sparrows.

I serve on the board of Directors of Algonquin Wildlife Research Station, where I conduct my research and have taught field ecology.

The main focus of my research is the behavioural ecology of white-throated sparrows. I am interested in the factors that influence nesting success, including food availability, weather and risk of predation. Most recently we have studied the effects of fire on territory settlement, nest site selection and nesting success. I study song variation between individuals and populations. I am also working on migration using both direct and indirect methods to estimate the wintering range of breeding birds. My main study site is in Algonquin Park, but I collaborate with colleagues on populations breeding in British Columbia.


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