Tom Hazell

Photo of Tom Hazell

Associate Professor Faculty of Science Kinesiology and Physical Education Waterloo, Ontario thazell@wlu.ca Office: (519) 884-1970 ext. 3048

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Click to Expand >>

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

Click to Shrink <<

Bio/Research

I grew up in Dundas, Ontario and received my undergraduate degree in Kinesiology from McMaster University (1999-2004). I then pursued a Master's degree in Human Kinetics at the University of Windsor under the supervision of Drs. Kenji Kenno and Jennifer Jakobi (2004-2006). After discovering a pas...

Click to Expand >>

Bio/Research

I grew up in Dundas, Ontario and received my undergraduate degree in Kinesiology from McMaster University (1999-2004). I then pursued a Master's degree in Human Kinetics at the University of Windsor under the supervision of Drs. Kenji Kenno and Jennifer Jakobi (2004-2006). After discovering a passion for research and teaching, I pursued a PhD in exercise nutrition at The University of Western Ontario under the supervision of Dr. Peter Lemon in the Exercise Nutrition Research Laboratory (2006-2010). Prior to joining Laurier, I completed a Post-doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill University under the supervision of Dr. Hope Weiler (2010-2012) and was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Lethbridge in Southern Alberta (2012-2014).

My research program aims to better understand how physical activity/exercise contributes to the regulation of appetite, its subsequent effects on energy intake, and its overall role in reducing positive energy balance and fat mass. Current funded work examines the regulation of energy intake via the specific mechanisms involved in how exercise alters appetite through the integration of peripheral signals with either orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) or anorexigenic (appetite-inhibiting) properties. Overall, we are interested in the potential for exercise intensity to improve energy balance through alterations in appetite regulation and post-exercise metabolism. With my research interests in nutrition/exercise physiology, I am also interested in the effect of different nutritional supplements or feeding strategies on exercise metabolism.


Click to Shrink <<