Tom Hazell

Photo of Tom Hazell

Associate Professor Faculty of Science Kinesiology and Physical Education Waterloo, Ontario thazell@wlu.ca Office: (519) 884-1970 ext. 3048

Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

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Media Relations

Claire Bruner-Prime
Communications and Media Relations Officer
cprime@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3684

Lori Chalmers Morrison
Director: Integrated Communications
lchalmersmorrison@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3067

Graham Mitchell
Director: Communications & Issues Management
gmitchell@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 3070

Brantford Campus:

Beth Gurney
Associate Director: Communications & Public Affairs
bgurney@wlu.ca
(519) 884-0710 ext. 5753

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Bio/Research

I grew up in Dundas, Ontario and received my undergraduate degree in Kinesiology from McMaster University (1999-2004). I then pursued a Master's degree in Human Kinetics at the University of Windsor under the supervision of Drs. Kenji Kenno and Jennifer Jakobi (2004-2006). After discovering a pas...

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Bio/Research

I grew up in Dundas, Ontario and received my undergraduate degree in Kinesiology from McMaster University (1999-2004). I then pursued a Master's degree in Human Kinetics at the University of Windsor under the supervision of Drs. Kenji Kenno and Jennifer Jakobi (2004-2006). After discovering a passion for research and teaching, I pursued a PhD in exercise nutrition at The University of Western Ontario under the supervision of Dr. Peter Lemon in the Exercise Nutrition Research Laboratory (2006-2010). Prior to joining Laurier, I completed a Post-doctoral Fellowship in the Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill University under the supervision of Dr. Hope Weiler (2010-2012) and was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Lethbridge in Southern Alberta (2012-2014).

My research examines the effect of exercise intensity and sex on energy balance by measuring both energy expenditure and the regulation of energy intake. I am principally interested in the potential for exercise intensity to improve energy balance through its potential to alter appetite regulation and post-exercise metabolism. Current funded work in my laboratory is examining potential mechanisms involved in the effect of exercise on appetite-regulating gut hormones. In addition, I am also interested in the potential acute and chronic health benefits of different exercise modalities such as high-intensity interval training.


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